Major improvements in TPC! Memory Usage for WordPress

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been actively developing some long-awaited TPC! Memory Usage features.  The highlights of the latest release are listed below.  I believe that these will help WordPress developers and administrators improve scalability and performance of their blogs and custom applications.

  • Custom checkpoints allow administrators to measure memory usage anywhere a WordPress action is available.
  • Optional file logging allows administrators to have an effective way of tracking memory usage.
  • Improved Security Check, and listed additional variables in System Overview.
  • Fixed various bugs (special thanks to those who have taken the time to report issues).

As we continue to improve TPC! Memory Usage and implement new features, we would love to hear your thoughts.  Feel free to leave a message on the official TPC! Memory Usage page.  As always, thank you for your continued support.

Download TPC! Memory Usage

6 thoughts on “Major improvements in TPC! Memory Usage for WordPress”

  1. Pingback: abcphp.com
  2. Hi Chris,
    I love your plugin. Thanks so much.

    I was wondering if you could explain the new ‘Load’ feature.

    For instance, what do the three numbers represent?
    What do the colors represent? Right now they are all red, but once one of the numbers was yellow.

    Thanks again,
    -Stan


  3. stan:

    Hi Chris,
    I love your plugin. Thanks so much.

    I was wondering if you could explain the new ‘Load’ feature.

    For instance, what do the three numbers represent?
    What do the colors represent? Right now they are all red, but once one of the numbers was yellow.

    Thanks again,
    -Stan

    Hi Stan,

    Thanks so much for the kind words. There’s a great entry on Wikipedia about this very thing. I’ve included a link below for your reading pleasure. The section entitled Unix-style load calculation is what you want to read.

    As far as the colors, green means that the load averages are in an acceptable range. Yellow means that the average load is still in an acceptable range, but are getting close to being too high. Red, as you may have deduced, means that the load average is high, and you may need to improve your server/hosting.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Load_%28computing%29#Unix-style_load_calculation

    I hope this helps!

    Thanks again,
    Chris

  4. Chris,

    Thanks so much for the information.

    I checked the server status on my cPanel and it said load was OK.

    I’m wondering why the discrepancy? I’ll keep digging around to see if I can figure out what to do.

  5. Hi Stan,

    cPanel may have different classifications for what constitutes an ‘OK’ server load. I may adjust this in the future, but based on my research the number ranges chosen to represent low, medium, and high load averages are on-par with what many professionals have to say.

    The numbers themselves should be similar… I’m pretty sure PHP uses the /proc/loadavg file to get this data like most other administration and monitoring software does.

    -Chris

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