Windows Experience Index assessment details in XML format

Since coming from Windows XP to Windows 7 (skipping Vista), I’ve come to love all of its new features, including the Windows Experience Index.  For those who are not aware, the Windows Experience Index is a score based on the performance of the CPU, RAM, graphics, gaming graphics, and the hard drive.  Microsoft touts it as a way to see how floor computer models match up against one another, specifically to be used when buying a new computer.  In addition, the Windows Experience Index can be used to do more than just calculate a score.  In fact, detailed results are constructed in XML format, and saved within a directory on your computer.

Control Panel: Windows Experience Index
Control Panel: Windows Experience Index

All data is kept in C:WindowsPerformanceWinSATDataStore.  You’ll also find historical data in this directory too, allowing you to compare and contrast new and previous hardware configurations.   Below is an example of part of a WEI XML file (Cpu.Assessment (Recent).WinSAT.xml):

	<CPUEncryption2Assessment>
		<OperationVersion Major="1" Minor="0" Build="0"
			Revision="0" />
		<CmdLine />
		<Units name="bs" units="B/s" descrip="bytes per second" />
		<Units name="bytes" units="bytes" descrip="bytes" />
		<Units name="ticks" units="ticks" descrip="cpu clock ticks" />
		<MaxThreads>NumberOfSchedulableUnits</MaxThreads>
		<NumThreads>2</NumThreads>
		<WorkingBufferSize units="bytes">14161920
		</WorkingBufferSize>
		<TotalBytesPerSecond units="bs">801609328.45389
		</TotalBytesPerSecond>
		<TotalBytesPerSecondMean units="bs">797473818.06012
		</TotalBytesPerSecondMean>
		<PerCPUData>
			<CPUData CPUIndex="0">
				<Repetitions>65536</Repetitions>
				<Min units="bs">702948620505.33411</Min>
				<Max units="bs">35014920881.11247</Max>
				<Median units="bs">681781864800.10449</Median>
				<Mean units="bs">680536637221.50549</Mean>
				<StartTick units="ticks" microseconds="19.76260">65515</StartTick>
				<EndTick units="ticks" microseconds="10074577.84893">33398233027</EndTick>
				<Duration units="ticks" microseconds="10074558.08633">33398167512</Duration>
			</CPUData>
			<CPUData CPUIndex="1">
				<Repetitions>35038</Repetitions>
				<Min units="bs">703301390059.02271</Min>
				<Max units="bs">145019957595.07748</Max>
				<Median units="bs">701184831597.10559</Median>
				<Mean units="bs">697507461791.60132</Mean>
				<StartTick units="ticks" microseconds="0.00000">0</StartTick>
				<EndTick units="ticks" microseconds="10164284.52807">33695619639</EndTick>
				<Duration units="ticks" microseconds="10164284.52807">33695619639</Duration>
			</CPUData>
		</PerCPUData>
		<CompletionStatus description="Success">0</CompletionStatus>
		<AssessmentRunTime>
			<Seconds>10.20300</Seconds>
			<Description>00:00:10.20</Description>
		</AssessmentRunTime>
	</CPUEncryption2Assessment>
	<CPUCompression2Assessment>
		<OperationVersion Major="1" Minor="0" Build="0"
			Revision="0" />
		<CmdLine />
		<Units name="bs" units="B/s" descrip="bytes per second" />
		<Units name="bytes" units="bytes" descrip="bytes" />
		<Units name="ticks" units="ticks" descrip="cpu clock ticks" />
		<MaxThreads>1</MaxThreads>
		<NumThreads>1</NumThreads>
		<WorkingBufferSize units="bytes">14161920
		</WorkingBufferSize>
		<TotalBytesPerSecond units="bs">202388248.41796
		</TotalBytesPerSecond>
		<TotalBytesPerSecondMean units="bs">182956801.39260
		</TotalBytesPerSecondMean>
		<PerCPUData>
			<CPUData CPUIndex="0">
				<Repetitions>65536</Repetitions>
				<Min units="bs">535388082928.49811</Min>
				<Max units="bs">35821899124.06532</Max>
				<Median units="bs">320248985272.75085</Median>
				<Mean units="bs">316151495915.79742</Mean>
				<StartTick units="ticks" microseconds="0.00000">0</StartTick>
				<EndTick units="ticks" microseconds="10025446.56421">33235357905</EndTick>
				<Duration units="ticks" microseconds="10025446.56421">33235357905</Duration>
			</CPUData>
		</PerCPUData>
		<CompletionStatus description="Success">0</CompletionStatus>
		<AssessmentRunTime>
			<Seconds>10.04700</Seconds>
			<Description>00:00:10.05</Description>
		</AssessmentRunTime>
	</CPUCompression2Assessment>

As you can probably see, this data has a lot of potential and can be used in a variety of applications.  I’m interested in seeing how some programs may use these indexes in the future.  Perhaps, we will start seeing programs that adjust performance based on the Windows Experience Index.

Got an idea on how to use WEI data?  Comment below!

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